Diseases Of The Thyroid Hashimoto’s Disease?

Automimmune disorders that occur with increased frequency in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, dermatitis

How serious is Hashimoto’s disease?

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis can be fatal – untreated, it can cause coma or heart problems – but with treatment, the prognosis is good. Risk factors for Hashimoto’s thyroiditis are: Female gender: Women are 10-15 times more likely than men to develop Hashimoto’s thyroiditis.

How is Hashimoto’s disease different from hypothyroidism?

Hashimoto’s disease is an autoimmune condition where the immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland. Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid is not releasing enough of the two main hormones it produces, T3 (triiodothyronine) and T4 (thyroxine).

What autoimmune diseases are associated with Hashimoto’s?

Automimmune disorders that occur with increased frequency in patients with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis include insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, myasthenia gravis, celiac disease, pernicious anemia, vitiligo, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, primary biliary cirrhosis, dermatitis

How is Hashimoto’s disease diagnosed?

The diagnosis of Hashimoto’s thyroiditis may be made when patients present with symptoms of hypothyroidism, often accompanied by a goiter (an enlarged thyroid gland) on physical examination, and laboratory testing of hypothyroidism, which is an elevated thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) with or without a low thyroid

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