Raynaud’s Syndrome And Autoimmune Diseases?

What autoimmune diseases are associated with Raynaud’s?

The diseases most often linked with Raynaud’s are autoimmune or connective tissue diseases such as:

  • Lupus (systemic lupus erythematous)
  • Scleroderma.
  • CREST syndrome (a form of scleroderma)
  • Buerger disease.
  • Sjögren syndrome.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Occlusive vascular disease, such as atherosclerosis.
  • Polymyositis.

Does Raynaud’s affect immune system?

Most cases of secondary Raynaud’s are associated with conditions that cause the immune system to attack healthy tissue (autoimmune conditions), such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus. However 1 in 10 people with primary Raynaud’s goes on to develop a condition associated with secondary Raynaud’s, such as lupus.

What is the difference between Raynaud’s disease and Raynaud’s syndrome?

Raynaud syndrome, also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon, is a medical condition in which spasm of arteries cause episodes of reduced blood flow. The two main types are primary Raynaud’s, when the cause is unknown, and secondary Raynaud’s, which occurs as a result of another condition.

What triggers Raynaud’s disease?

With Raynaud’s, arteries to your fingers and toes go into vasospasm when exposed to cold or stress, narrowing your vessels and temporarily limiting blood supply. Exposure to cold, such as putting your hands in cold water, taking something from a freezer or being in cold air, is the most likely trigger.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *