Why Are Some Diseases Called Bloodborne?

Germs that can have a long-lasting presence in human blood and disease in humans are called bloodborne pathogens.

The most common and dangerous germs spread through blood in the hospital are: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV).

These viruses cause infections and liver damage.

What are bloodborne diseases?

Bloodborne diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms, which exist in blood and other body fluids. There are many different bloodborne pathogens, including malaria, syphilis, and brucellosis, and most notably Hepatitis B (HBV), Hepatitis C (HCV) and the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

What is the most common blood borne disease?

There are 26 different viruses that have been shown to present in healthcare workers as a result of occupational exposure. The most common blood-borne diseases are hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Are there only 3 bloodborne diseases?

Bloodborne pathogens and workplace sharps injuries. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are three of the most common bloodborne pathogens from which health care workers are at risk.

Which disease is bloodborne and can cause liver damage?

The Hepatitis B virus is known as a bloodborne virus, because it is transmitted from one person to another via blood or fluids contaminated with blood. The virus attacks the liver. It can cause scarring of the liver, liver cancer, liver failure, and death.

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