Difference Between Infectious And Communicable Diseases?

So, what is a contagious disease?

Recap time.

Communicable diseases are infectious diseases.

An infectious disease is contagious when it spreads through direct, bodily contact with an infected person, their discharges, or an object or surface they’ve contaminated.

What’s the difference between contagious and communicable?

A communicable disease is a contagious one. The effect is external. If someone catches the illness, they can get sick and spread the pathogen—be it a cold, virus, or some other disease-causing agent—onto the next person.

What are communicable diseases?

Communicable diseases, also known as infectious diseases or transmissible diseases, are illnesses that result from the infection, presence and growth of pathogenic (capable of causing disease) biologic agents in an individual human or other animal host.

What makes an infection communicable?

Communicable, or infectious diseases, are caused by microorganisms such as bacteria, viruses, parasites and fungi that can be spread, directly or indirectly, from one person to another. Some are transmitted through bites from insects while others are caused by ingesting contaminated food or water.

What is the difference between communicable disease and non communicable disease?

Communicable diseases are the diseases which passes from one individual to another individual. They are generally caused by some bacteria, viruses or any other pathogens. For example, malaria, AIDS etc. Non-communicable diseases are the diseases which does not spread from one person to another person.

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