Wwi Diseases In The Trench?

But the majority of loss of life can be attributed to famine and disease – horrific conditions meant fevers, parasites and infections were rife on the frontline and ripped through the troops in the trenches.

Among the diseases and viruses that were most prevalent were influenza, typhoid, trench foot and trench fever.

What was life like in the ww1 trenches?

On the Western Front, the war was fought by soldiers in trenches. Trenches were long, narrow ditches dug into the ground where soldiers lived. They were very muddy, uncomfortable and the toilets overflowed. These conditions caused some soldiers to develop medical problems such as trench foot.

What was the most common cause of death in ww1?

Most of the casualties during WWI are due to war related famine and disease. Civilian deaths due to the Spanish flu have been excluded from these figures, whenever possible. Moreover, civilian deaths include the Armenian Genocide.

How many deaths in ww1 were specifically from disease?

War deaths before WW1The average annual strength of the army during the war was 210,000, of whom 5774 were killed in action, 2018 died of wounds and 13,250 died of disease, of which 8227 were killed by typhoid fever [2].

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